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Rupert Wyman 19th Apr 2010 - 7:19

David Cameron the toff

David Cameron was a high flyer in the Conservative Party when he was elected to the House of Commons as MP for Witney in the 2001 General Election and made a rapid rise through the party, eventually elected as leader in 2005.

However, he could well struggle to make the step up from opposition leader to Prime Minister.

The Conservatives are 15/8 to form a majority at the election but their ratings in the opinion polls have been falling and surely after 13 years of an incumbent government they should be in a far better position as the with the nature of political cycles the electorate desire change just as they did in 1997 following 18 years of Conservative rule.

I believe the Tories falling ratings are as a result as the image of the front bench of the Conservative Party as a whole, but mainly Cameron and his sidekick, the shadow chancellor, George Osborne.

Cameron has difficulty in getting his message across to the public and trying to get them to believe he is an honourable man who they can trust.

This could be the reason why Cameron has failed to "win" the first two leaders' debates as the public seem unable to trust him and his message enough.

With the middle names of William and Donald he is not a man that many of the electorate can relate to with his privileged upbringing and education at Eton College and Oxford University.

Then again a certain Anthony Charles Lynton Blair was privately educated before going to Oxford as well and he managed to become the Labour Party's most successful ever leader in winning three consecutive General Elections.

The impression the electorate seem to have is that Cameron is the second coming of Blair plenty of rhetoric with good oratory skills but with little substance behind the style. Blair had the advantage of not coming across a full on toff whereas Cameron isn't so lucky and his performance in the first leaders' debate did not help him.

However, in last week's second debate Cameron delivered an improved performance, but if he is to make the transition from Leader of the Opposition to Prime Minister on 6 May then he must once again improve in this week's final debate.

Cameron will never get away from being a toff, so the question is in 2010 do the people of Great Britain actually want a man who has not had to count the pennies in his personal life and therefore does not relate to the hardship that many face following the recession?

David Cameron was a high flyer in the Conservative Party when he was elected to the House of Commons as MP for Witney in the 2001 General Election and made a rapid rise through the party, eventually elected as leader in 2005.

 

Please note the above is this writer's personal critique of David Cameron not William Hill's opinion.

 

 
 
 

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