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Stuart Dalgleish 19th Jan 2011 - 9:55

Cancer patient funds £10k hospital equipment from beyond the grave

A CANCER patient who won £10,000 by betting that he would survive longer than his doctors had predicted died just days before he was set to win a further £10,000 by staying alive until June 1, 2010.

But now the winnings he would have collected have purchased a vital piece of equipment with which Harefield hospital, where he was treated, will be able to progress their fight against the disease which killed him.

Jon Matthews, 59, who lived near Milton Keynes, was diagnosed as being terminally ill with Mesothelioma in early 2007. His doctors told him he was unlikely to survive until the end of the year. He contacted William Hill in October of that year to ask whether they would be prepared to take a bet from him that he would still be alive not only on June 1, 2008 but also on June 1, 2009 and June 1, 2010.

Jon won the first two bets, collecting winnings of £5,000 on both June 1, 2008 and June 1, 2009 from his two bets of £100 at 50/1 each time, but he died when within days of a third win, this time of £10,000 after betting £100 at 100/1.

BUT BOOKIES WILLIAM HILL DONATED THE £10,000 JON WOULD HAVE WON, TO FUND A VITAL PIECE OF EQUIPMENT NEEDED BY THE HOSPITAL WHERE HE WAS TREATED - AND THE HOSPITAL HAS NOW TAKEN DELIVERY OF IT.

'I had never been asked to accept a bet of this nature before in over thirty years at William Hill, but as Jon approached me directly and was adamant that it would give him an additional incentive to battle his illness, I decided to offer him the wager he wanted' said Hill's spokesman Graham Sharpe.

'Never had I been so pleased to pay a winning client £5000 on two occasions - and I was very sad that he didn't quite make it to win his third bet and felt it would be an appropriate gesture on our part to offer the money to the hospital where he had been treated and of which he spoke so highly.


We agreed to fund a top of the range Oxylog 3000 transport ventilator for the hospital, which told us they would be delighted to acquire one to treat patients with similar problems to Jon, and which cost the £10,000 we offered to donate
.'

 

 
 
 

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